Word of the Week – Twerk

I’m sure everyone has heard of this new word, Twerk, which has made it to the Oxford Dictionary, but do we all know what it means to Twerk?  The first time I heard of “Twerk” was from the Miley Cyrus music video, Wrecking Ball.  I found the definition of Twerk as per the Oxford Dictionary and decided that this will be my word of the week.

twerk

New words: August 2013

Pronunciation: /twəːk/

verb

[no object] informal

  • dance to popular music in a sexually provocative manner involving thrusting hip movements and a low, squatting stance:just wait till they catch their daughters twerking to this song twerk it girl, work it girl

Origin:

1990s: probably an alteration of work

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Word of the Week – Perturbed

perturbed

per·turb
  [per-turb]  
verb (used with object)

1. to disturb or disquiet greatly in mind; agitate.
2. to throw into great disorder; derange.
3. Astronomy . to cause perturbation in the orbit of (a celestial body).
 
Origin: 
1325–75; Middle English perturben  (< Old French perturber ) < Latin perturbāre  to throw into confusion,equivalent to per- per- + turbāre  to disturb; see turbid

Related forms

per·turb·a·ble, adjective
per·turb·a·bil·i·ty, noun
per·tur·ba·tious  [pur-ter-bey-shuhs] , adjective
per·turb·ed·ly  [per-tur-bid-lee]  Show IPA , adverb
per·turb·ed·ness, noun

Synonyms 
1. trouble. 2. confuse, addle, muddle.

Antonyms 
1. pacify.

Word of the week – Floccinaucinihilipilification

floccinaucinihilipilification

noun

[mass noun] rare

  • the action or habit of estimating something as worthless.

Origin:

mid 18th century: from Latin floccinaucinihilipili (words meaning ‘at little value’) + -fication. The Latin elements were listed in a well-known rule of the Eton Latin Grammar

Floccinaucinihilipilification is one of a number of very long words that occur very rarely in genuine use. 

Word of the Week – Confabulate

confabulate

Pronunciation: /kənˈfabjʊleɪt/

verb

  • 1 formal engage in conversation; talk:

“she could be heard on the telephone confabulating with someone”

  • 2 Psychiatry fabricate imaginary experiences as compensation for loss of memory:

“she has lapses in attention and concentration—she may be confabulating a little”

Derivatives

confabulation

noun

confabulatory

adjective

 

Origin:

early 17th century: from Latin confabulat- ‘chatted together’, from the verb confabulari, from con- ‘together’ + fabulari(from fabula ‘fable’)

Word of the week – Perfunctory

perfunctory

Pronunciation: /pəˈfʌŋ(k)t(ə)ri/
 
Definition of perfunctory

adjective

  • (of an action) carried out without real interest, feeling, or effort:he gave a perfunctory nod

Derivatives

perfunctorily

adverb

perfunctoriness

noun

 

Origin:

late 16th century: from late Latin perfunctorius ‘careless’, from Latin perfunct- ‘done with, discharged’, from the verbperfungi

Word for the week – Pertinacious

pertinacious

Syllabification: (per·ti·na·cious)
Pronunciation: /ˌpərtnˈāSHəs/
Definition of pertinacious

adjective

formal

  • holding firmly to an opinion or a course of action:he worked with a pertinacious resistance to interruptions

Derivatives

pertinaciously

adverb

pertinaciousness

noun

pertinacity

Pronunciation: /-ˈasitē/

noun

Origin:
early 17th century: from Latin pertinaxpertinac- ‘holding fast’ + -ous