Word of the Week – Selfie

selfie

Pronunciation: /ˈsɛlfi/
(also selfy)

noun (plural selfies)

informal

  • a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website:occasional selfies are acceptable, but posting a new picture of yourself every day isn’t necessary

Origin:

early 21st century: from self + -ie

Example of a “Selfie

Image,

Word of the Week – Alacrity

alacrity [uh-lak-ri-tee]  

noun

1. cheerful readiness, promptness, or willingness: 
            “We accepted the invitation with alacrity.”
2. liveliness; briskness.

 
Origin: 
late Middle English: from Latin alacritas, from alacer ‘brisk’

Related forms:

alacritous, adjective
unalacritous, adjective

Synonyms 
1. eagerness, keenness; fervor, zeal. 
2. sprightliness, agility.

Word of the Week – Perturbed

perturbed

per·turb
  [per-turb]  
verb (used with object)

1. to disturb or disquiet greatly in mind; agitate.
2. to throw into great disorder; derange.
3. Astronomy . to cause perturbation in the orbit of (a celestial body).
 
Origin: 
1325–75; Middle English perturben  (< Old French perturber ) < Latin perturbāre  to throw into confusion,equivalent to per- per- + turbāre  to disturb; see turbid

Related forms

per·turb·a·ble, adjective
per·turb·a·bil·i·ty, noun
per·tur·ba·tious  [pur-ter-bey-shuhs] , adjective
per·turb·ed·ly  [per-tur-bid-lee]  Show IPA , adverb
per·turb·ed·ness, noun

Synonyms 
1. trouble. 2. confuse, addle, muddle.

Antonyms 
1. pacify.

Word of the week – Floccinaucinihilipilification

floccinaucinihilipilification

noun

[mass noun] rare

  • the action or habit of estimating something as worthless.

Origin:

mid 18th century: from Latin floccinaucinihilipili (words meaning ‘at little value’) + -fication. The Latin elements were listed in a well-known rule of the Eton Latin Grammar

Floccinaucinihilipilification is one of a number of very long words that occur very rarely in genuine use. 

Word of the Week – Confabulate

confabulate

Pronunciation: /kənˈfabjʊleɪt/

verb

  • 1 formal engage in conversation; talk:

“she could be heard on the telephone confabulating with someone”

  • 2 Psychiatry fabricate imaginary experiences as compensation for loss of memory:

“she has lapses in attention and concentration—she may be confabulating a little”

Derivatives

confabulation

noun

confabulatory

adjective

 

Origin:

early 17th century: from Latin confabulat- ‘chatted together’, from the verb confabulari, from con- ‘together’ + fabulari(from fabula ‘fable’)

Word of the week – Perfunctory

perfunctory

Pronunciation: /pəˈfʌŋ(k)t(ə)ri/
 
Definition of perfunctory

adjective

  • (of an action) carried out without real interest, feeling, or effort:he gave a perfunctory nod

Derivatives

perfunctorily

adverb

perfunctoriness

noun

 

Origin:

late 16th century: from late Latin perfunctorius ‘careless’, from Latin perfunct- ‘done with, discharged’, from the verbperfungi